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Laser Treatment for Hair Loss: Does It Work?

Laser Treatment for Hair Loss: Does It Work?

Every day, most people lose about 100 hairs from their scalp. While the majority of people grow those hairs grow back, some people don’t due to:

  • age
  • heredity
  • hormonal changes
  • medical conditions, such as lupus and diabetes 
  • poor nutrition
  • side effects of medical treatment, such as chemotherapy.
  • stress 

Treatments to stop hair loss and possibly reverse it include:

  • medications such as minoxidil (Rogaine) and finasteride (Propecia)
  • hair transplant surgery
  • laser therapy

Does laser treatment for hair loss work?

What it does

Low-level laser therapy — also referred to as red light therapy and cold laser therapy — irradiates photons into scalp tissues. These photons are absorbed by weak cells to encourage hair growth.

It’s widely accepted that the procedure is safe, tolerable, and less invasive than hair transplant surgery. 

The theory

The theory of laser treatment for hair loss is that the low-dose laser treatments invigorate circulation and stimulation that encourages hair follicles to grow hair.

Studies have shown that LLLT stimulated hair growth in mice subjected to chemotherapy-induced alopecia and also in alopecia areata. Controlled clinical trials demonstrated that LLLT stimulated hair growth in both men and women. Among various mechanisms, the main mechanism is hypothesized to be the stimulation of epidermal stem cells in the hair follicle bulge and shifting the follicles into the anagen phase.

Conclusion: LLLT for hair growth in both men and women appears to be both safe and effective. The optimum wavelength, coherence, and dosimetric parameters remain to be determined.

 

The results

Because the results of laser therapy are inconsistent, the conclusion of the medical community seems to be that it appears to work for some people, but not for others.

More research is needed, but some studies have yielded encouraging results:

  • According to a 2014 study trusted source, low-level laser therapy appeared to be safe and effective for hair growth in both men and women.
  • A 2013 study trusted Source of 41 males ages 18 to 48 found that laser hair treatment provided a 39 percent increase in hair growth over a period of 16 weeks.

 

100% of active male and female users saw visible hair growth with an average increase of 43.23% in hair count.

Whether you're a man or woman, you can grow thicker, fuller, and healthier hair fast with the clinical-strength laser hair restoration technology. You can use it on its own or combine it with other hair loss treatments; physicians believe low-level laser therapy (LLLT) can be used to enhance the results of other hair loss treatments (such as biotin supplements, hair growth shampoo, conditioner, foam, Rogaine, minoxidil, Propecia, finasteride, and other hair growth products)

 

What are the positives of laser treatment for hair loss?

There are a number of reasons that advocates cite to encourage participation in the procedure, including:

  • it’s noninvasive
  • it’s painless
  • there are no side effects
  • it increases hair strength

What are the negatives of laser treatment for hair loss?

There are a number of reasons that some people are not as positive about the procedure, such as:

  • It’s time-consuming. To see results, treatment often requires several sessions a week for a number of months. Although the number of sessions might taper off, most providers suggest that you continue treatments for the rest of your life.
  • It’s expensive. Clinical laser treatments for hair loss can cost thousands of dollars a year.
  • It may not be effective. The procedure appears to be less effective for people in the advanced stages of hair loss as opposed to those in the early stages.
  • It can interact with certain medications. Laser therapy should not be performed on people taking medications that are photosensitizing. Photosensitizing is a chemical alteration to the skin that increases someone’s sensitivity to light.

 

 

 


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